Mr Christensen is the first minister from the lower house and the latest to pledge not to support the legislation, which could put the coalition into a minority.
The government has control in the lower house with 76 MPs out of 151, the minimum number for an outright majority.
But if Mr Christensen decides to cross the floor, the coalition will need the support of at least one crossbench member to pass legislation.
Queensland MP George Christensen is the latest coalition member threatening to withhold his vote as they call on Prime Minister Scott Morrison to overturn coronavirus vaccine mandates across the country. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Gary Ramage
“Until federal action is taken against vaccine discrimination, I will be voting according to my conscience, or abstaining from votes… rather than just voting with the government a MPs usually do,” he said in a statement.
“I intend not to be beholden to party room discipline when voting in the House of Representative.”
He said he will continue to support the government on supply and confidence motions.
“My support is not guaranteed on bills or substantive motions,” Mr Christensen said.
“When action is taken to stop vaccine discrimination, I will go back to the normal process of voting with the government”.
Five Coalition senators back Pauline Hanson’s bill
One Nation leader Pauline Hanson introduced a bill banning vaccine discrimination and called for Mr Morrison to overturn double dosed requirements for state and territories on Monday.
It was fiercly debated with Senator Jacquie Lambie blasting Ms Hanson’s draft legislation, suggesting the party should not be preaching about discrimination when they had history of discrimination against people of multicultural backgrounds and the LGBTIA+ community.
“If you get behind a wheel of a car and drive twice the speed, you are putting other people’s live at risk. You don’t have the right to do that,” she emotionally said in the Senate.
“You are not being discriminated against. You choose to do something that puts other people’s lives at risk. You will be held accountable for that.
“People who don’t get the vaccine have a choice. We all get a choice. You’re making a choice that means you’re more likely to get COVID-19 and spread it, that is your choice, that is your right.”
“Being held accountable for your own actions isn’t called discrimination, it’s called being, you wouldn’t believe it, a goddamn bloody adult”.
She accused Ms Hanson of trying to drum up support ahead of the federal election next year and “playing Russian roulette” with the lives of Australians.
Senator Jacquie Lambie blasting Ms Hanson’s draft legislation, suggesting the party should not be preaching about discrimination when they had history of discrimination against people of multicultural backgrounds and the LGBTIA+ community.
One Nation leader Pauline Hanson introduced a bill banning vaccine discrimination and called for Mr Morrison to overturn double dosed requirements for state and territories on Monday. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Gary Ramage
Four of the five Senators Sam McMahon, Concetta Fierravanti-Wells, Matt Canavan and Gerard Rennickm, crossed the floor to support the banning vaccine discrimination bill. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Gary Ramage
Five MPs crossed the floor in support of One Nation’s bill including Liberals Senators Gerard Rennick, Alex Antic and Concetta Fierravanti-Wells and Nationals Senators Matt Canavan and Sam McMahon.
But the bill was overwhelmingly rejected by 44 to five votes.
Crossbenchers Bob Katter and former coalition Craig Kelly have also suggested withholding votes over their view on vaccination mandates.
The latest debate over compulsory jabs could delay the voting and discussions on other legislation such as the religious discrimination bill, voter ID and a crackdown on charities engaging in unlawful trespass.
‘We don’t support a mandatory vaccination program’: Frydenberg
Mr Morrison said ministers were free to express their views from time to time but did not agree to what was set out in the bill.
“We don’t agree with the measures that were in the bill which would indeed threaten funding for hospitals and school to states,” he said.
“But I respect the fact that individual members from time to time will express a view and they’ll vote accordingly”.

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